2019-20 American Fulbright Scholar Award grantees

During 2019-20, UK universities will host Fulbright Scholar Award grantees from a range of academic disciplines and professions.

David Blaney

David Blaney

University of Sheffield Scholar Award, University of Sheffield - Political Science

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David Blaney

David Blaney

University of Sheffield Scholar Award, University of Sheffield - Political Science

I grew up in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and did my undergraduate work in Political Science at Valparaiso University (Indiana). I now teach Political Science at Macalester College in St. Paul, MN.  

My interest in political economy and the history of economic thought began as a graduate student in International Studies at the University of Denver. It is there that I first read Adam Smith and learned that reading economists can be fun, as long as you recognize that each thinker offers a global moral vision, for good or ill or both.  

I will be in Sheffield from September through March. I will continue research I have begun on economic thought, liberalism, and empire. I will be reading and writing about early British neoclassical economists somewhat against the grain as international theorists, who were fixated on the political, economic, and cultural/racial context of global competition and empire. Sheffield is a fertile intellectual space for such work. It also seems like a perfect launching point for hikes in South and North Yorkshire.  

Jennifer Browne

Jennifer Browne

Queen’s University Belfast (Creative Writing) Scholar Award, Queen's University Belfast - Creative Writing

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Jennifer Browne

Jennifer Browne

Queen’s University Belfast (Creative Writing) Scholar Award, Queen's University Belfast - Creative Writing

I am an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, where I teach courses in poetry writing and environmental studies, and also co-direct the Women and Gender Studies Minor. Having served first as the 2016 Poet Laureate of the City of San Antonio, and consequently as the 2017-18 Poet Laureate of the State of Texas, Im excited for the opportunities this Fulbright will provide to build both artistic and civic connections through the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. My own poems have always been place-based, exploring how landscape remains inseparable from history, linguistics, and memory. My recent work focuses on places in transition and my experience living near and writing about the US Mexico border has in part informed my interest in living, writing and teaching in Belfast in the time of Brexit. Im particularly interested in the social functions of poetry, and how Northern Irelands industrial heritage, political violence and partitioned status challenge picturesque imaginings of nature poetry, as well as idealized feminizations of landscape. Speaking of landscape, San Antonio averages 200 days of sunshine a year, so my Belfast preparations also include investing in a decent raincoat. 

Alison Brysk

Alison Brysk

Oxford-Pembroke Visiting Professorship Award, Pembroke College, Oxford University - International Relations

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Alison Brysk

Alison Brysk

Oxford-Pembroke Visiting Professorship Award, Pembroke College, Oxford University - International Relations

I have spent three decades researching international human rights. Along the way, I have taught at four universities and travelled to 43 countries, with prior Fulbright awards in Canada and India-- culminating in my current position chairing Global Studies at the University of California Santa Barbara.

My graduate studies focused on human rights transitions in Latin America-and Argentina’s Mothers of the Disappeared.  Since then, I have written seven books on worldwide struggles of human rights movements for democracy, indigenous rights, protection from human trafficking, and security from gender violence.

My last book, The Future of Human Rights, will be the theme of my UK Fulbright project: a series of seminars on how international human rights can adapt to an era of rising nationalism, global inequality, and scepticism regarding international institutions.  I am looking forward tremendously to collaboration with my UK colleagues on these urgent challenges—and listening to really old music in really old churches!  

Chien-fei Chen

Chien-fei Chen

Fulbright Global Scholar Award, Cardiff University - Environmental Sociology

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Chien-fei Chen

Chien-fei Chen

Fulbright Global Scholar Award, Cardiff University - Environmental Sociology

I am a research associate professor and director of education and diversity program at an engineering research center called, Center for Ultra-wide-area Resilient Electrical Energy Transmission Networks, the University of Tennesse, Knoxville.  I have somewhat unusual experience as I am an environmental sociologist working an engineering research center. This requires a broad interdisciplinary perspective. My research centers on bridging the gap between social science, technology, and engineering. My Fulbright project involves cross-cultural research focusing on energy justice and renewable energy adoption among low-income households in the U.K. and China through the investigation of social, behavioral, environmental, and technical impacts.

Going to the U.K. will allow me to extend my current collaborations by compairing the different energy behavioral practices, social norms and policy between Eastern and Western cultures. Understanding local residents’ attitudes in and around Cardiff will help me better understand the norms and culture. In my free time, I love to play piano, cello and cook, and so hope to enjoy all kind of music and good food in the UK.

John Connelly

John Connelly

U.S. Friends of Queen’s University Belfast Visiting Professorship Award, Queen's University Belfast - History

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John Connelly

John Connelly

U.S. Friends of Queen’s University Belfast Visiting Professorship Award, Queen's University Belfast - History

I am a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley and currently director of the Institute for East European, Eurasian, and Slavic Studies. I have a BSFS from Georgetown University, an MA (in Russian and East European Studies) from the University of Michigan and a PhD from Harvard University. I have also published Captive University: The Sovietization of East German, Czech and Polish Higher Education (Chapel Hill, 2000), which won the 2001 George Beer Award of the American Historical Association, and From Enemy to Brother: The Revolution in Catholic Teaching on the Jews (Harvard UP, 2012), which was awarded the John Gilmary Shea prize of the American Catholic Historical Association. Currently, I’m working on a history of East Central Europe, 1784 to present, due to appear with Princeton University Press; as well as a history of Austro-fascism. My research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Spencer Foundation, the German Marshall Fund, the Austrian Marshall Fund, the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), Fulbright-Hayes, the International Research and Exchanges Board. I am additionally on the editorial boards of Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropaforschung, Slavic Review, and the Journal of Modern History, as well as the Kuratorium of the Imre Kertesz Kolleg in Jena. 

David Corina

David Corina

Fulbright Global Scholar Award, University College London - Linguistics and Psychology

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David Corina

David Corina

Fulbright Global Scholar Award, University College London - Linguistics and Psychology

I am a professor with appointments in the departments of Linguistics and Psychology at the University of California, Davis. Davis CA is a small northern California city located between Sacramento and San Francisco. I am director of the Cognitive Neurolinguistics Laboratory at the U.C. Davis Center for Mind and Brain. My research explores issues of language and cognitive processing in adults and children with congenital deafness. Increasingly, I am interested in the implementation of language policies in the face of technological interventions for deaf children (e.g. cochlear implants) and how cultural constructs of disability influence delivery services. As a Fulbright Global Scholar, I will investigate these issues in London, Qatar and Hong Kong. While in the U.K., I will work with faculty at University College London’s Deafness Cognition and Language Centre to gain an appreciation of experiences and expectations of parents with children who have received a cochlear implant(s). As a large metropolitan multicultural city, London faces unique challenges for language intervention services. As an avid musician, in my free time I look forward to exploring traditional folk and indie music venues and sessions. 

Denise Cote-Arsenault

Denise Cote-Arsenault

Edinburgh Napier University Scholar Award, Napier Edinburgh University - Nursing

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Denise Cote-Arsenault

Denise Cote-Arsenault

Edinburgh Napier University Scholar Award, Napier Edinburgh University - Nursing

I have recently moved to St. Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri where I am Endowed Professor of Maternal Child Nursing. I have been in academia for over 30 years and care deeply about the care of pregnant mothers and new-borns, and particularly when pregnancy ends suddenly in the death of the baby. I am really looking forward to extending my research about parent experiences of pregnancy loss by being in Edinburgh to learn about perinatal bereavement care and through conducting an ethnographic study. My desire to be a Fulbrighter stems, I believe, from my father having a Fulbright in Munich when I was 5 years old. We lived there for a full year. That experience instilled in me a desire to travel and to experience other cultures. I enjoy working with international graduate students, learning from them about nursing in their own countries. My architect husband is able to be in Edinburgh during my 3 months there. We will explore Scotland’s history, architecture and hike through many of its beautiful sites. Urban living in Edinburgh will provide a wonderful immersion into Scottish life and people. The faculty at Napier Edinburgh University will be wonderful mentors and informants as well.  

Julie Crockett

Julie Crockett

Queen Mary University of London Scholar Award, Queen Mary University of London - Mechanical Engineering

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Julie Crockett

Julie Crockett

Queen Mary University of London Scholar Award, Queen Mary University of London - Mechanical Engineering

I am an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Brigham Young University in Utah. I have always been fascinated by flowing fluids, such as waterfalls, or objects moving through fluids, such as airplanes. I have had the opportunity to accomplish research in fluid mechanics from large scale ocean waves to small droplets on microstructured surfaces. Through my Fulbright I hope to add an even smaller, nano-scale, understanding to my repertoire. My Fulbright will allow me to learn modelling techniques and share experimental methodologies to define nano-material (one atom thick) motion in impinging liquid droplets. This research will lay the groundwork for future improvements in nano-sheet manufacturing and processing techniques for enhanced capability of medical and electrical devices. I am excited to work with new collaborators to advance our knowledge and improve current research techniques through different points of view. I am also looking forward to spending time in a new country, with a different culture, where there is so much history and social experience to learn from. I enjoy visiting historically significant sites and spending time in nature. I look forward to travelling both cities and the countryside to visit many of these types of sites throughout the UK. 

Casey Diekman

Casey Diekman

University of Exeter Scholar Award, University of Exeter - Mathematical Biology

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Casey Diekman

Casey Diekman

University of Exeter Scholar Award, University of Exeter - Mathematical Biology

I am an Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, NJ. My research area is mathematical biology, with a focus on using mathematical modelling and computer simulation to understand how the brain generates the daily oscillations in physiology and behaviour known as circadian rhythms. My interest in this field began as a graduate student at the University of Michigan, when I was part of a team of mathematicians and biologists working together to test the counterintuitive predictions made by a mathematical model of circadian clock neurons. As a Fulbright Scholar, I will have the opportunity to conduct interdisciplinary research at the Living Systems Institute (LSI) and develop models of the complex interactions between the genes, proteins, and neuronal networks that constitute the mammalian circadian clock. The LSI is home to several leading experts in computational neuroscience and is an ideal setting for achieving breakthroughs in my research and forming new long-term international collaborations. As part of my Fulbright activities, I will also work with the Translational Research Exchange at Exeter to reach out to the public and communicate the relevance of this research to night shift work and ageing. 

Liliana Donchik Belkin

Liliana Donchik Belkin

University of Roehampton Scholar Award, University of Roehampton - Educational Policy and Administration

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Liliana Donchik Belkin

Liliana Donchik Belkin

University of Roehampton Scholar Award, University of Roehampton - Educational Policy and Administration

I am currently an educational policy administrator for the New York City Department of Education, supporting an innovative early college and career high school model aimed at increasing access to higher education and careers in science/technological fields for underrepresented students. My background includes teaching for 8 years in public schools in the San Francisco Bay Area which motivated me to pursue my doctorate in educational policy and administration at New York University. My research focuses on policies and practises that impact educational access for formerly incarcerated youth and market-based reform efforts in the US and UK, specifically how educational policy is shaped and implemented and its impact(s) on vulnerable youth.  

While at the University of Roehampton, I will pursue research on comparative market-based reform efforts in education and criminal justice policy in the US and UK. I will also have opportunities to teach courses on the similarities and differences of educational policy reform in both countries.  

In my free time, I have an exhaustive list of London sites to visit. I hope to learn the many neighbourhoods and my way around by foot, tube, and bus. I also hope to visit as many of the city’s greenspaces and landmarks as I can manage! 

Arthur Glasfeld

Arthur Glasfeld

Durham University Scholar Award, Durham University - Chemistry

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Arthur Glasfeld

Arthur Glasfeld

Durham University Scholar Award, Durham University - Chemistry

Currently, I am the Margret Geselbracht Professor of Chemistry at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Over the past 30 years I have supervised over 100 undergraduates in their senior thesis research and taught broadly across the chemistry curriculum, with a specialization in biochemistry. Since my time as a graduate student, I've been fascinated by nature’s ability to fine-tune molecules to achieve functions with a precision that is difficult to impossible to replicate in the lab. My recent work has looked at the ability of sensor proteins in bacteria to selectively recognize and respond to specific metals (such as iron and manganese) in the cell - an ability that is critical to evading the human immune system. So far, my work has been directed at individual protein molecules. At Durham University, I'm excited to be joining a lab in the Biosciences Department working in a more biologically relevant context to explore how bacteria simultaneously control a variety of metal ion concentrations, using a suite of sensor and trafficking proteins. Outside of the lab, I am an avid rower. I look forward to joining a local masters rowing program and participating in regattas around the UK, while also taking time to explore other outdoor and cultural activities in Northern England and Scotland. 

Susan Grayzel

Susan Grayzel

University of Leeds Distinguished Chair Award, University of Leeds - History

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Susan Grayzel

Susan Grayzel

University of Leeds Distinguished Chair Award, University of Leeds - History

I’m a professor of history at Utah State University, my latest stop in a career spent teaching modern European history, and researching and publishing about women, gender and war. I’ve been lucky enough to have visited the UK many times to conduct and present research, so I feel like I know my way around London fairly well or at least how to get to my key spots: the Imperial War Museum, National Archives, Sadler’s Wells and Tate Modern. But I’m eager to get to know a new part of the country and a new city, with its own rich archives, libraries, museums and venues. While in Leeds, I look forward to putting the finishing touches on my latest book—with the working title "The Age of the Gas Mask: Chemical Weapons and Civilian Bodies in Imperial Britain, 1915-1945." Here, I argue that one material object [the civilian gas mask] can help us understand the ways in which the British empire came to terms with modern war.  I also plan to teach a post-graduate seminar on the history of the body, and eagerly await the opportunity to engage with students and colleagues there.  Beside my work, I hope to find time to enjoy theatre, dance and art and to go for long walks and slow but steady runs.

Matthew Hughey

Matthew Hughey

University of Surrey Scholar Award, University of Surrey - Sociology

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Matthew Hughey

Matthew Hughey

University of Surrey Scholar Award, University of Surrey - Sociology

In my life west of the pond, I serve as Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA). As a frequent global traveller, I also hold affiliate positions at Nelson Mandela University (South Africa), the University of Barcelona (Spain) and the University of Cambridge (England). Overall, I examine the forms and functions of race and racism and have received numerous awards and support from sources such as the American Sociological Association, National Science Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Based on my prior research on whiteness in the US, I will use my time in England to study the growth of nationalism, reactionary populism and white racial identity formation. In particular, I will examine how local, all-white groups in the greater London area respond to both real and imagined racial changes. This project is a well-timed, cross-national, natural experiment that fits well with Surrey Sociology’s mission to develop field-defining and conceptually driven empirical research [through] extensive collaborations with European and international researchers and networks. As a Fulbright scholar I will be in the greater London area from April to October 2020. This time will allow me to share my work internationally, learn from my British colleagues and enable me to pursue my other passion of cricket!  

Jonathan Kelber

Jonathan Kelber

Cancer Research UK Scholar Award, University of Manchester - Biology

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Jonathan Kelber

Jonathan Kelber

Cancer Research UK Scholar Award, University of Manchester - Biology

I am an Associate Professor of Biology and Director of the Developmental Oncogene Laboratory at California State University Northridge (CSUN). I supervise grad students, undergrads and postdocs who are tackling projects aimed at understanding how molecular and cellular heterogeneity within the tumour microenvironment drives progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. This Fulbright-Cancer Research UK Scholar Award supports my research collaboration with Dr Martin Humphries at the University of Manchester Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Matrix Research. Since Martin’s team has made seminal discoveries about how cells communicate with their extracellular environment, this partnership will allow me to investigate new mechanisms by which matrix proteins influence pancreatic cancer cell state diversity to drive stress and therapy resistance. We hope that this new collaboration may yield both novel treatment strategies for this deadly malignancy as well as new cross-cultural partnerships between CSUN and the University of Manchester. On a personal note, I am delighted that we (my wife and our three children will join me for the year) get to immerse ourselves in British culture and learn more about Europe. 

Jeffery Kennedy

Jeffery Kennedy

British Library Eccles Centre Scholar Award, The British Library - Theatre Studies

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Jeffery Kennedy

Jeffery Kennedy

British Library Eccles Centre Scholar Award, The British Library - Theatre Studies

I'm an Associate Professor at Arizona State University in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, where I teach courses in Interdisciplinary Arts and Performance. Because of my study and skills in multiple genres of artmaking, this program has been the perfect fit for me. With a continued professional career as a director, music director, composer, arranger, producer, and actor, and I'm also a scholar in American theatre history. My first book was about the history of the Provincetown Players, the theatre group that ushered America into the modern era at the beginning of the 20th century. My next project, a survey of American theatre history from colonial to contemporary times, was launched from this project. Im excited and honoured to be chosen as a Fulbright Scholar, and will be using the resources of the British Library to look at the plays that the early British companies presented in the American colonies, as well as the resources identified by the Eccles Centre of American Studies to look at other areas of American theatre available in the Library.  One of the fantastic benefits of being in London from January-July this next year will be to take advantage of the wealth of British theatre on stage. 

Wendy Kline

Wendy Kline

University of Birmingham Distinguished Chair Award, University of Birmingham - History

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Wendy Kline

Wendy Kline

University of Birmingham Distinguished Chair Award, University of Birmingham - History

I am a professor and Dema G. Seelye Chair in the History of Medicine in the Department of History at Purdue University. At Purdue, I particularly enjoy teaching courses that focus on the history of psychiatry and the history of women's health. I recently completed my third book, Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth (Oxford UP 2019). I am also a professional violinist and perform with the Lafayette Symphony Orchestra. I am excited to return to the U.K. I spent six months in Glasgow last year investigating the papers of psychiatrist R.D. Laing. Through my research, I developed a greater interest in trying to capture the exchange of psychiatric ideas and therapies between the U.S. and the U.K. in the twentieth century. My current project, an in-depth historical study of the rise and fall of LSD treatment in the U.K., centres on the remarkable story of Powick hospital, where LSD first crossed the border from Europe to England. While the history of LSD therapy has received extensive analysis in Europe and the U.S., there currently exists no in-depth historical study of its use in the U.K. My fifteen-year-old daughter and I look forward to exploring Birmingham together. She, too, is an accomplished violnist and we hope to find some opportunites to perform during out stay. 

Kristi Kiick

Kristi Kiick

University of Nottingham Scholar Award, University of Nottingham - Chemistry, Materials Science, and Engineering

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Kristi Kiick

Kristi Kiick

University of Nottingham Scholar Award, University of Nottingham - Chemistry, Materials Science, and Engineering

In the USA, I am both an alumna of the University of Delaware (BS Chemistry), and the Blue and Gold Distinguished Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. I mentor approximately 15 graduate students and postdocs, in research projects in which we synthesize materials with exact control, in the same way that proteins are produced in nature. This allows us to finely tune their interactions with cells, which we take advantage of for designing new materials for drug delivery, wound healing and cardiovascular therapies. My Fulbright-sponsored work at the University of Nottingham will be focused on developing advanced manufacturing protocols to make specific structures with our materials, in an interdisciplinary collaboration with outstanding scientists and clinicians in the School of Pharmacy, the Faculty of Engineering and the Queen’s Medical Centre. We plan to use these structured materials to develop organoids with potential applications in drug screening. My family and I are looking forward to our year in the UK, and are planning lots of hiking, biking, and running in the Peak District, as well as learning about the history and culture of the UK and Europe through daily life and traveling. 

David Lloyd

David Lloyd

Cardiff University Scholar Award, Cardiff University - Literature

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David Lloyd

David Lloyd

Cardiff University Scholar Award, Cardiff University - Literature

I am a poet, fiction writer, and critic, and I direct the Creative Writing Program at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, NY. I am also the son of immigrants from Wales who settled in the Welsh-American community in Utica, NY. I grew up hearing Welsh spoken at home, at community events and in the church where my father served as minister. I completed a study abroad year in Wales at Aberystwyth University, and after receiving my B.A. from St. Lawrence University, spent a year in Wales on a Watson Fellowship, researching modern Anglophone Welsh poetry, and writing poetry, which I first published in The Anglo-Welsh Review. Since then I have published ten books - including three poetry collections and three books of fiction. Much of my scholarship, poetry, and fiction addresses Welsh culture - in particular my most recent story collection, The Moving of the Water, set in the Welsh-American community where I grew up. My 2019 Fulbright at Cardiff University is the culmination of decades of personal, scholarly, and creative engagement with Wales. My research proposal centres on a book project that re-interprets and re-evaluates twentieth-century Welsh and American writers in light of their transatlantic dialogues. Im also looking forward to engaging in the vibrant creative writing and arts scene in Cardiff, and more generally in Wales.  

Margaret McAllister

Margaret McAllister

Scotland Visiting Professorship Award, University of Edinburgh, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences - Music

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Margaret McAllister

Margaret McAllister

Scotland Visiting Professorship Award, University of Edinburgh, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences - Music

I live in Boston and am a professor in the Composition department at Berklee College of Music.  I teach a wide compass of subjects in music theory and composition, music history and technology. As an active classical composer, I have composed concert music for many combinations. I was born in Scotland to Scottish parents and immigrated to the United States as a child. I will be Visiting Professor at the University of Edinburgh from January to August of 2020 where my host departments are Celtic and Scottish Studies and the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities. Connections between music and language, have influenced multiple facets in my creative thinking about music. My project is to collaborate with Scottish poet Aonghas MacNeacail, using an artistic process that is synergistic and experimental to create a new work for chorus and orchestra featuring texts in Gaelic and English. I am excited to have access to the bibliographic and archival resources uniquely available in Scotland, to learn from and interact with colleagues in Celtic and Scottish Studies, IASH and the Reid School of Music at the University, and to participate in the rich cultural life of the city of Edinburgh. 

John McCloy

John McCloy

University of Sheffield Scholar Award, University of Sheffield, Materials Engineering

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John McCloy

John McCloy

University of Sheffield Scholar Award, University of Sheffield, Materials Engineering

I am a professor at Washington State University in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and a joint appointee at the US Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supervising about 15 students at all levels in materials research. I am passionate about our responsibility as citizens of the earth to secure its liveability for future generations. Scientists and engineers must work diligently to find safe and reliable means to immobilize and store nuclear waste. This environmental responsibility is acutely obvious in my home region, where a large amount of radioactive waste has accumulated over 80 years. The debates around treatment and storage are quite like those being faced in northern England, with citizens sharing many concerns. My time in the UK will involve collaborative work toward finding technical and public engagement solutions to problems in nuclear waste management. A Fulbright in the UK also connects me to my heritage as a descendant of Scottish-Irish immigrants, as well as to the recent past as the grandson of a Fulbright scholar to Taiwan in 1962. That year, in Hawaii en route to Taiwan, my father witnessed one of the last high-altitude nuclear bomb tests over the Pacific. As was the case then, our current generation continues to struggle with the benefits and liabilities of atomic energy. 

John Mortensen

John Mortensen

Fulbright Global Scholar Award, Royal Northern College of Music - Music

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John Mortensen

John Mortensen

Fulbright Global Scholar Award, Royal Northern College of Music - Music

I serve as Professor of Piano and Director of Keyboard Studies at Cedarville University in Ohio, where I teach studio piano, chamber music, and improvisation. At the Royal College of Music, I will continue my work on historic improvisation: the system of musicianship training that allows one to create complete works in styles such as Baroque fugues and Classical sonatas.

I will teach methods of improvisation to individual students, lecture to classes, and present improvised concerts at RNCM and elsewhere in the UK. I also hope to complete my new book on fugue improvisation while in Manchester. 

Daniel Oerther

Daniel Oerther

King’s College London Research Scholar Award, King's College London - Environmental Sciences

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Daniel Oerther

Daniel Oerther

King’s College London Research Scholar Award, King's College London - Environmental Sciences

Back home, I’m on the faculty of the Missouri University of Science and Technology. This is my third Fulbright award. In 2005, I visited India where I taught environmental engineers how to clean up water, and in 2012, I studied sustainable agriculture as the Fulbright-ALCOA Distinguished Chair to Brazil. In 2020, I’m researching how to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance while I visit the School of Population Health and Environmental Sciences at King’s. A future in which antibiotics fail undermines modern healthcare because infections after surgical procedures will become life threatening and more kids may die from common childhood infections. We must explore upstream policies at the nexus of human health, veterinary medicine, and environmental stewardship – an approach known as One Health. To support my Fulbright, I’m building a network in the UK as a Chartered Engineer and Chartered Environmentalist, and I’ve become a Fellow of the Society for Environmental Engineers, the Royal Society for Public Health and the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health. Stopping the spread of antibiotic resistance requires professional and international collaboration. As the largest centre for medical teaching and biomedical research in Europe and home to the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s is an ideal partner in my work. 

Nicholas Paul

Nicholas Paul

University of Birmingham Scholar Award, University of Birmingham - Medieval Studies

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Nicholas Paul

Nicholas Paul

University of Birmingham Scholar Award, University of Birmingham - Medieval Studies

I am associate professor of History and director of the Center for Medieval Studies at Fordham University in New York, the city where I was born and raised. The period I study, the central Middle Ages (c. 1000-c. 1300 CE), saw the establishment of many structures and institutions that came to play a large role in the history of the premodern world, including Christian holy wars that we call the crusades and new ideas about social class such as hereditary nobility and courtly behaviour. My research concerns the relationship between these phenomena of holy war and social distinction. The Fulbright-University of Birmingham Scholar Award will give me the opportunity to spend time in Europe, in close proximity to the archives and materials of medieval historical research. The University of Birmingham is currently the strongest department for research in History in the United Kingdom, and their staff number many experts in the study of the medieval world and especially the crusades and the Near East. In addition to talking to them about specific research questions, I also hope to use this opportunity to talk about the place of the Middle Ages in contemporary discourse about politics and identity, both in the UK and the US.  

Stephanie Pincetl

Stephanie Pincetl

University of Manchester Distinguished Chair Award, University of Manchester - Geography

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Stephanie Pincetl

Stephanie Pincetl

University of Manchester Distinguished Chair Award, University of Manchester - Geography

I started and direct the California Center for Sustainable Communities at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. We work on urban energy and water use, urban ecology and the impacts cities have on surrounding and far flung regions. I will be postulating post carbon cities or how cities must transform to reduce their Earth systems and climate impacts. Manchester and its exceptional Geography Department is an ideal place to explore how cities are attempting to move to a post carbon era, most often, today described as carbon neutral. Since Manchester was the heart of the industrial revolution and the fossil fuel era, what better place to examine plans for carbon neutrality goals for 2030. Some of the questions will include whether carbon neutrality involves carbon offsets which simply use other places as carbon sinks, or whether there will be substantive change locally. Given the UK’s colonial history, carbon offsets could be yet another colonial enterprise, or if there is genuine replacement of fossil fuels with renewables, perhaps Manchester will be again at the forefront of massive change. I am looking forward to visiting English gardens, tasting single malt whiskies and locally produced gins, as well as regionally grown foods of all kinds.

C. Ariel Pinto

C. Ariel Pinto

Fulbright Cyber Security Scholar Award, Swansea University - Cyber Security

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C. Ariel Pinto

C. Ariel Pinto

Fulbright Cyber Security Scholar Award, Swansea University - Cyber Security

I am a mentor, educator and researcher in the Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management at Old Dominion University, in the city of Norfolk, Virginia, USA where the air is filled with the sweet smell of the Atlantic Ocean all year round. Even when I was still an engineer in the Philippines more than 25 years ago, I was obsessed with wanting to know how and why things work. That obsession has brought me all over the world - Asia, Africa, Australia and the Americas. More recently, I have been asking the other and more difficult question: how and why things do not work. And I have recognized that many answers to this question lay beyond the field of engineering. My Fulbright project will be the systemic analysis of emerging risks for smaller technology companies in the UK that use Artificial Intelligence (AI) in regulating terrorist content on social media platforms. For several months, I will live, work, and play among the many wonders of nature in Wales and the rest of the UK. I am excited to eventually soak in the sounds, savour the taste and imbibe the spirits on both sides of the Atlantic. 

Bradley Sageman

Bradley Sageman

University of Birmingham Scholar Award, University of Birmingham - Geology

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Bradley Sageman

Bradley Sageman

University of Birmingham Scholar Award, University of Birmingham - Geology

I am a professor in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at Northwestern University, where I have conducted research and taught courses in the fields of stratigraphy and geochemistry for the past 27 years. I am most proud of the diversity of my research contributions, spanning many subdisciplines, my 12 years of service as department chair, which achieved a renaissance in our unit and my devotion to excellence in teaching. When I was awarded my first Fulbright for a year of research at Universität Tubingen, the experience was transformative. This time around, the motivation to apply was a bit more personal: at the memorial for a very close friend who succumbed to cancer several years ago, I met a faculty member from the University of Birmingham. He had recently come to know and admire my late friend, a professor of geology at Yale, through their shared interest in paleoclimate studies. Because paleoclimate reconstruction is also a focus of my research (motivated by concern for the future of Earths climate system), the possibility for new collaborative work was born out of deep loss. My new colleague encouraged me to apply for a Birmingham-Fulbright award, and the rest is history! The work we will complete together will be dedicated to the memory of Professor Mark Pagani. 

Angelique Szymanek

Angelique Szymanek

University of Dundee (Art & Design) Scholar Award, University of Dundee - Art History

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Angelique Szymanek

Angelique Szymanek

University of Dundee (Art & Design) Scholar Award, University of Dundee - Art History

Originally from Buffalo, New York, I currently teach modern and contemporary art history courses at Hobart & William Smith Colleges. I received a Ph.D. in Art History from the State University of New York at Binghamton where I began my career-long commitment to studying histories of feminist art and activism. My focus has been artists whose work addresses issues of gendered violence and I intend to expand the current literature on the subject to include the contributions of cultural producers and activists in Scotland. While in residence at the University of Dundee, I will work with the faculty, students, and members of the community to create a living archive of knowledge regarding past and present histories of feminist art and activism both locally and nationally. Throughout my years of research, I have frequently been faced with absences and imbalances regarding recognition of the contributions and innovations of women. Among the many underrepresented regions within European art history, Scotland is one. I look forward to collaborating with newfound colleagues, friends, artists and curators to begin bridging this gap. I will be sharing this experience with my young son, Miles. When I am not working, I will be exploring the food, culture and countryside of the UK with him, especially, as he has requested, "all the castles." 

 

Dana Van Kooy

Dana Van Kooy

National Library of Scotland Scholar Award, National Library of Scotland - Literature

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Dana Van Kooy

Dana Van Kooy

National Library of Scotland Scholar Award, National Library of Scotland - Literature

I’m an associate professor in the Humanities Department at Michigan Technological University, where I teach courses in English literature and have been the Director of the English program. My first book, Shelleys Radical Stages (Routledge 2016) explores the radical history and the theatrical culture that Percy Bysshe Shelley engaged when writing his dramas in the early nineteenth century. Since then, I’ve become more concerned with Atlantic theatre and, more particularly, with how literary narratives and those in the visual and performing arts shaped our inherited conceptions of colonialism, slavery and modernity in the early Atlantic world. As a Fulbright scholar, I will examine the textual and visual culture that evolved in response to the Scottish Clearances and the legislative and military actions taken to secure Scotlands place within the imperial constructs of Great Britain and the United Kingdom. Additionally, I will situate Scotland and place its cultural productions in dialogue with the complex geo-cultural landscape of the Atlantic world. While I will miss shovelling more than a couple of feet of the 200+ inches of snow that fall along the shores of Lake Superior, I will find consolation in hiking Arthurs seat, exploring the Highlands of Scotland, and visiting Edinburghs art galleries. 

Abigail Van Slyck

Abigail Van Slyck

University of York (All Disciplines) Scholar Award, University of York - Architectural History

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Abigail Van Slyck

Abigail Van Slyck

University of York (All Disciplines) Scholar Award, University of York - Architectural History

I have recently completed a four-year term as Dean of the Faculty at Connecticut College, where I have been the Dayton Professor of Art History for 20 years. My discipline is architectural history and my passion is interpreting buildings to understand the priorities, anxieties, and lived experience of the people who commissioned and used them. A study of Carnegie libraries in the U.S. and (thanks to an earlier Fulbright) in New Zealand triggered my interest in the architecture of childhood. After completing a book on children’s summer camps, I have now turned my attention to cottages and playhouses built for the children of elite families. This Fulbright is an excellent fit, both for allowing (relatively) easy access to the Swiss Cottage (constructed for the offspring of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert) and also for providing a home-base at the University of York, which boasts one of the largest communities of architectural historians in the U.K. I know these four months (from September through December 2019) will fly by. Architectural history may be my job, but it also enriches my everyday experience; interesting buildings are everywhere. With my husband, Mitch Favreau, I look forward to exploring gardens and cathedral cities of the north. 

Amy Werbel

Amy Werbel

University of York (History of Art) Scholar Award, University of York - Art History

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Amy Werbel

Amy Werbel

University of York (History of Art) Scholar Award, University of York - Art History

It might at first seem like mere quirky semantic fun that I will be traveling to York from New York, where I am Professor of the History of Art at the Fashion Institute of Technology. My Fulbright research project, however, is all about the ways in which American speech laws were first derived from and then ultimately diverged from the English Common Law tradition. The difference between what I can exhibit and look at in New York vs. York is the result of hundreds of years of similarity and then difference in the domain of art censorship cases. Comparing the two traditions will help me further develop a primary question I have examined for the last fifteen years: What does our American First Amendment promise and guarantee, and is it possible to live up to it while still maintaining a civil society and vibrant democracy? Artists have always been instrumental in representing our societal and legal norms and in challenging them. During my first Fulbright Scholar award in China, 2011-2012, my family and I indulged in every delightful local food and drink we encountered. Once again, we will continue that tradition, and look forward to eating plenty of Sunday roasts and curries and hoisting a few pints with new friends.  

Gregory Winston

Gregory Winston

Queen's University Belfast (Irish Literature) Scholar Award, Queen's University Belfast - Literature

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Gregory Winston

Gregory Winston

Queen's University Belfast (Irish Literature) Scholar Award, Queen's University Belfast - Literature

As Professor of English at Husson University, I teach a wide range of literature and humanities courses. My fascination with the literature of Ireland first took hold when, as a teenager, I journeyed solo south to north across the island; three decades on, it draws me across the Atlantic again. My Fulbright teaching and research will consider the ecological context of several modern Irish writers, including the namesake of my host institution, the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast. I simply cannot imagine a better place to pursue this interest than a city and campus where talented writers, scholars and students are doing valuable work in Irish Studies. Fulbright means the privilege of participating in traditions of scholarly exchange without borders--all the more significant in a moment when some would choose isolation over collaboration, separateness instead of common ground. I look forward to engaging with others and contributing to the broader project of Irish ecocriticism and environmental humanities emerging around the globe. Additionally, I hope to explore environments foundational to the region’s life and literature. Hiking glens, paddling rivers, and cycling city streets will be recreation and research, ways of learning the human and more-than-human ecologies of Ulster.